Wandering in Wat Arun

Many tourists have flocked to Thailand to enjoy the Sand, Sea and Som Tum (read as: Food). However, a lot of travelers also find the temples in Thailand as unique and amusing this blogger included.

I am a fan of great civilizations of the world and I really hope I have the time (and the money) to visit ancient man-made wonders. I was fortunate to visit Angkor Wat of Cambodia sometime last year as well as few old temples in Thailand like in Ayutthaya and looking forward to visit other places like Great Wall of China, Forbidden City, Taj Mahal, Borobudur then after which the other farther places.

I’m fascinated by the sheer beauty of the various Buddhist temples I visited in Thailand. Every temple I see has their own characteristic and charm. Last Saturday, me and 2 friends decided last minute to go to Wat Arun also popularly called Temple of the Dawn.

I’ve passed by Wat Arun many times in the past years I’ve been based in Thailand but never get to see the temple up close as mostly I view it from the deck of the various Dinner Cruises I took every time a friend is visiting. At night, Wat Arun is fully lit up and is already a sight to behold. However when you see the temple at arms length, you will admire the intricate design and architecture as well as the picturesque view of Bangkok from the top of the temple.

According to Wikipedia, Wat Arun’s full name is Wat Arun Ratchawararam Ratchawaramahawihan taken from the Indian God of Dawn, Aruna. The temple got it’s name because “the first light of the morning reflects off the surface of the temple with pearly iridescence.”

Wat Arun is located at the other side of Chao Phraya River (Thonburi side) which is considered as old Bangkok. Entrance fee is THB 50 per person. Visitors are also expected to follow the dress code when visiting this temple. Ladies should not wear revealing clothes (sleeveless) or wear short pants. There is a skirt rental in the ticket booth at the entrance for 20 Baht. Men are also expected to wear proper attire.

The Central Tower is quite high and you will have to climb a steep steel ladder to get a better view of the surrounding areas from the tower (also called Prang).

Then on the banks of the river which is just opposite of the temple, public commuter ferries are plenty. To cross the other side of the river, one must pay THB 3.00 per person. Then to go to the other station near the city (most tourists drop at Si Phraya station) you have to pay THB 15.00 per person.

After getting off at Si Phraya we decided to take a walk to Chinatown which is not so far away (around 20 minutes walk) to have our sumptuous dinner of Chinese Food.

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